Crisis Revolutions And Self-Sustained Growth Essays In European Fiscal History

Books

Edited Books

Sharon Adams and Julian Goodare (eds.), Scotland in the Age of Two Revolutions (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2014 ).

Steve Boardman and Julian Goodare (eds.), Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300-1625: Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014).

Julian Goodare (ed.), Scottish Witches and Witch-Hunters (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

Julian Goodare and Alasdair A. MacDonald (eds.), Sixteenth-Century Scotland: Essays in Honour of Michael Lynch (Leiden: Brill, 2008).

Julian Goodare, Lauren Martin and Joyce Miller (eds.), Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). This book was shortlisted by the Folklore Society for the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award 2008.
Julian Goodare (ed.), The Scottish Witch-Hunt in Context (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002).
Julian Goodare and Michael Lynch (eds.), The Reign of James VI (East Linton: Tuckwell, 2000).

Articles and Book Chapters

Julian Goodare, ‘Seely Wights, Fairies and Nature Spirits in Scotland’, in Éva Pócs (ed.), Body, Soul, Spirits and Supernatural Communication (Newcastle, 2018, forthcoming).

Julian Goodare, ‘Between Humans and Angels: Scientific Uses for Fairies in Early Modern Scotland’, in Michael Ostling (ed.), Fairies, Demons and Nature Spirits: 'Small Gods' at the Margins of Christendom (London, 2018), 169-190.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Octavians’, in Miles Kerr-Peterson and Steven J. Reid (eds.), James VI and Noble Power in Scotland, 1578-1603 (Abingdon, 2017), 176-193.

Julian Goodare, ‘Visionaries and Nature Spirits in Scotland’, in Bela Mosia (ed.), Book of Scientific Works of the Conference of Belief Narrative Network of ISFNR, 1-4 October 2014, Zugdidi (Zugdidi: Shota Meshkia State Teaching University of Zugdidi, Georgia, 2015), 102-116.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Rise of the Covenanters, 1637-1644’, in Michael J. Braddick (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution (Oxford, 2015), 43-59.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Convention of Estates of 1630’, Scottish Historical Review, 93 (2014), 217-239.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Revolution’, in Sharon Adams and Julian Goodare (eds.), Scotland in the Age of Two Revolutions (Woodbridge, 2014), 79-96.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Ainslie Bond’, in Steve Boardman and Julian Goodare (eds.), Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300-1625: Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald (Edinburgh, 2014), 301-319.

Julian Goodare, ‘Boundaries of the Fairy Realm in Scotland’, in Karin E. Olsen and Jan R. Veenstra (eds.), Airy Nothings: Imagining the Otherworld of Faerie from the Middle Ages to the Age of Reason: Essays in Honour of Alasdair A. MacDonald (Leiden, 2014), 139-169.

Julian Goodare, ‘Flying Witches in Scotland’, in Julian Goodare (ed.), Scottish Witches and Witch-Hunters (Basingstoke, 2013), 159-176.

Julian Goodare, ‘In Search of the Scottish Agrarian Problem’, in Jane Whittle (ed.), Landlords and Tenants in Britain, 1440-1660: Tawney's Agrarian Problem Revisited (Woodbridge, 2013), 100-116.

Julian Goodare, ‘Witchcraft in Scotland’, in Brian P. Levack (ed.), The Oxford  Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America (Oxford, 2013), 300-317.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Cult of the Seely Wights in Scotland’, Folklore, 123 (2012), 198-219.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Presbyterian Movement in 1596’, Canadian Journal of History, 45 (2010), 21-48.

Julian Goodare, ‘Parliament and Politics’, in Keith M. Brown and Alan  R. MacDonald (eds.), The History of the Scottish Parliament, vol. iii:  Parliament in Context, 1235-1707 (Edinburgh, 2010), 244-274.

Julian Goodare, ‘Debate: Charles I: A Case of Mistaken Identity’, Past  and Present, 205 (November 2009), 189-201.

Julian Goodare, ‘A Balance Sheet for James VI of Scotland’, Journal of European Economic History, 38 (2009), 49-91.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Debts of James VI of Scotland’, Economic History Review, 62 (2009), 926-952.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Parliament of Scotland to 1707’, in Clyve Jones (ed.), A Short History of Parliament (Woodbridge, 2009), 300-319.

Julian Goodare, ‘Men and the Witch-Hunt in Scotland’, in Alison Rowlands (ed.), Witchcraft and Masculinities in Early Modern Europe (Basingstoke, 2009), 148-170.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Attempted Scottish Coup of 1596’, in Julian Goodare and Alasdair A. MacDonald (eds.), Sixteenth-Century Scotland: Essays in Honour of Michael Lynch (Leiden, 2008), 311-336.

Julian Goodare, ‘Scottish Witchcraft in its European Context’, in Julian Goodare, Lauren Martin and Joyce Miller (eds.), Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Basingstoke, 2008), 26-50.

Julian Goodare, ‘How Archbishop Spottiswoode Became an Episcopalian’, Renaissance and Reformation, 32 (2006/07), 83-103.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Witchcraft Act’, Church History, 74 (2005), 39-67.

Julian Goodare, ‘The First Parliament of Mary Queen of Scots’, Sixteenth Century Journal, 36 (2005), 55-75.

Julian Goodare, ‘John Knox on Demonology and Witchcraft’, Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte, 96 (2005), 221-245.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Parliament and its Early Modern “Rivals”’, Parliaments, Estates and Representation, 24 (2004), 147-172.

Julian Goodare, 'Mary [Mary Stewart] (1542-1587), Queen of Scots', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004), vol. 37, pp. 77-93 (plus 11 shorter articles in ODNB).

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Political Community and the Parliament of 1563’, Albion, 35 (2003), 373-397.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Witchcraft Panic of 1597’, in Julian Goodare (ed.), The Scottish Witch-Hunt in Context (Manchester, 2002), 52-72.

Julian Goodare, ‘Witch-Hunting and the Scottish State’, in Julian Goodare (ed.), The Scottish Witch-Hunt in Context (Manchester, 2002), 122-145.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Admission of Lairds to the Scottish Parliament’, English Historical Review, 116 (2001), 1103-1133.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Aberdeenshire Witchcraft Panic of 1597’, Northern Scotland, 21 (2001), 17-37.

Julian Goodare, ‘Scotland’s Parliament in its British Context, 1603-1707’, in H. T. Dickinson and Michael Lynch (eds.), The Challenge to Westminster: Sovereignty, Devolution and Independence (East Linton, 2000), 22-32.

Julian Goodare, ‘Scottish Politics in the Reign of James VI’, in Julian Goodare and Michael Lynch (eds.), The Reign of James VI (East Linton, 2000), 32-54.

Julian Goodare, ‘James VI’s English Subsidy’, in Julian Goodare and Michael Lynch (eds.), The Reign of James VI (East Linton, 2000), 110-125.

Julian Goodare, ‘Thomas Foulis and the Scottish Fiscal Crisis of the 1590s’, in W. M. Ormrod, Margaret Bonney and Richard Bonney (eds.), Crises, Revolutions and Self-Sustained Growth: Essays in European Fiscal History, 1130-1830 (Stamford, 1999), 170-197.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Parliamentary Records, 1560-1603’, Historical Research, 72 (1999), 244-267.

Julian Goodare, 'Women and the Witch-Hunt in Scotland’, Social History, 23 (1998), 288-308.

Julian Goodare, 'The Statutes of Iona in Context’, Scottish Historical Review, 77 (1998), 31-57.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Estates in the Scottish Parliament, 1286-1707’, Parliamentary History, 15 (1996), 11-32.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Scottish Parliament of 1621’, Historical Journal, 38 (1995), 29-51.

Julian Goodare, ‘Scotland’, in R. W. Scribner, Roy Porter and Mikulas Teich (eds.), The Reformation in National Context (Cambridge, 1994), 95-110.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Long Hundred in Medieval and Early Modern Scotland’, Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 123 (1993), 395-418.

Julian Goodare, ‘The Nobility and the Absolutist State in Scotland, 1584-1638’, History, 78 (1993), 161-182.

Julian Goodare, ‘Parliamentary Taxation in Scotland, 1560-1603’, Scottish Historical Review, 68 (1989), 23-52.

Julian Goodare, ‘Queen Mary’s Catholic Interlude’, in Michael Lynch (ed.), Mary Stewart: Queen in Three Kingdoms (Oxford, 1988), 154-170.

Editions of Texts

Julian Goodare (ed.), 'Diary of the Convention of Estates, 1630', Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, vol. 14 (2010), 86-110.

Julian Goodare (ed.), 'Fiscal Feudalism in Early Seventeenth-Century Scotland', Miscellany of the Scottish History Society, vol. 13 (2004), 191-225.

Websites

Julian Goodare, (Co-author with Lauren Martin, Joyce Miller and Louise Yeoman:) ‘The Survey of Scottish Witchcraft, 1563-1736’ (archived January 2003, updated October 2003).

Journal of Interdisciplinary History 32.2 (2001) 282-283



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Book Review

The Rise of the Fiscal State in Europe, c. 1200-1815.


The Rise of the Fiscal State in Europe, c. 1200-1815. Edited by Richard Bonney (New York, Oxford University Press, 1999) 544pp. $110.00

Much of the political and economic history of Europe, from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century, was driven by the demands of fisc, as states sought the tax revenues needed to fund the continent's recurrent wars. When they lacked the money to fight, states might have to summon representative institutions, thus taking the first steps toward parliamentary government. Or they might try to crush whatever repre-sentation already existed, thus taking steps toward autocracy. Another alternative was to borrow money, default on existing loans, or undertake dubious financial innovations, such as selling government offices. Whatever the states finally did, it is clear that the connection between taxes and politics is a ripe topic for historical analysis, and, in recent years, a number of historians and social scientists--Bonney among them--have taken it up, creating what has sometimes been called "the new fiscal history."

For over a decade, Bonney has been at the helm of a project that aims to write a new fiscal history of European states from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. His team has already produced one comparative volume and a second one devoted to detailed aspects of European [End Page 282] fiscal history. Soon they will publish a third tome as well, which will unveil a new model of change in European fiscal history. 1

The multi-authored book under review is part of this team effort. Its intentions are not primarily comparative; rather than surveying broad parallels from country to country, it instead presents detailed independent case studies of the fiscal development of a dozen countries or regions, including England, France, Castile, the Holy Roman Empire, the Low Countries, Switzerland, Italy, Russia, Poland, and Lithuania. It does not claim to cover all these countries and regions evenly or uniformly. The sources and available scholarly expertise preclude doing so. Nor do the book's chapters all use the same model, or even the same categories, to describe how each region's fiscal system operated. As a result, some readers may be a bit frustrated, because they will not easily be able to compare, say, the fraction of government expenditures that went for warfare in Poland with the fraction spent on war in England.

Nonetheless, the book will certainly be a valuable source for historians and social scientists who want to understand the fiscal systems of early modern Europe and how they varied and evolved. Not only does the book provide essential information about the level and nature of taxes, but it also takes up the issues that are often overlooked in older fiscal histories, such as government borrowing and the nature of government expenditures. (Related evidence from the other work that the team has done is available on the World Wide Web site that Bonney has established.) Like the other books done by Bonney's team, this volume will prove particularly important for those who want to generalize about the relationship between warfare, taxation, and political development.

 

Philip T. Hoffman
California Institute of Technology

Notes

1. Richard Bonney (ed), Economic Systems and State Finance (Oxford, 1995); W.M. Ormrod, M.M. Bonney and Richard Bonney (eds), Crises, Revolutions, and Self-Sustained Growth: Essays in European Fiscal History, c 1130-1830 (Stamford, 1999).

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